The Imitation Game – Affecting

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Sometimes it’s the people no one imagines anything of who do the things that no one can imagine.

You almost certainly won’t have heard of Morten Tyldum (director of the wonderful Headhunters). And, quite frankly, why should you. You’ll hopefully remember his name once you’ve seen his latest directorial offering, The Imitation Game. Yes, the one with Benedict Cumberbatch.

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The Imitation Game presents us with a telling of Alan Turing’s life and more specifically his role in bringing World War II to an end. Now seen as something of a hero, Turing was looked upon by many as a flawed man. A mathematical genius, socially awkward and with a predilection for things other than female company, he was a complicated character.

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Mr. Cumberbatch’s performance to bring such a character to life is exceptional. Special recognition must also go to Alex Lawther, who plays Turing during his school years. The idiosyncrasies of his behaviour, physically and vocally, are demonstrated by both with extreme thought. But it’s not just the performances that stands out.

Eloquently written, The Imitation Game weaves its narrative magic to great effect. Depicting events during Turing’s life out of chronological order heightens the process and feeds the audience with the right amount of information at the right time. Those moments that intrinsically shape us during our formative years are used to exquisite effect throughout the film to help us understand Turing’s struggles, making it all the more thought-provoking.

The supporting cast is impressive too. Wonderful turns from Charles Dance as Turing’s Commanding Officer, Mark Strong as his man at MI6 and Keira Knightley – playing Turing’s “closest” friend Joan Clarke – all require special mention. The Imitation Game is a sublime piece of cinema and I’m glad I finally got the chance to see it on the big screen.

Thank you for reading 🙂

 

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